Since 1988, the  Perkins School of Youth Ministry  has taken place each January as a way to offer a collaborative learning environment for sharing best practices and trends relating to youths in the church. Bart Patton, with more than 20 years of experience in ministry, is the director of Youth and Young Adult Ministry Education at  Perkins School of Theology . He recently sat down for a question-and-answer session about youth ministry and what the youth ministry participants can expect at this year’s gathering.

This marks the 30th anniversary of Perkins School of Youth Ministry. How has youth ministry changed since 1988 — and what keeps people coming back year after year?

The practice of youth ministry has become fully contextual. Gone are the days of the top-down, hierarchical models for ministry. I think that’s a great thing. We’re coming up with some major shifts in the understanding of youth culture — both spiritually and culturally. As the church wrestles with how to define and achieve success in reaching and discipling young people, we’re re-evaluating and questioning old models and striving for content that can help us adopt effective paradigms.

Our professional development opportunities are easily searchable, helping you further your education in a way that’s meaningful and convenient. Use our advanced search options below to browse our offerings by format, credit type and more. Learn how to earn credits »

Since 1988, the  Perkins School of Youth Ministry  has taken place each January as a way to offer a collaborative learning environment for sharing best practices and trends relating to youths in the church. Bart Patton, with more than 20 years of experience in ministry, is the director of Youth and Young Adult Ministry Education at  Perkins School of Theology . He recently sat down for a question-and-answer session about youth ministry and what the youth ministry participants can expect at this year’s gathering.

This marks the 30th anniversary of Perkins School of Youth Ministry. How has youth ministry changed since 1988 — and what keeps people coming back year after year?

The practice of youth ministry has become fully contextual. Gone are the days of the top-down, hierarchical models for ministry. I think that’s a great thing. We’re coming up with some major shifts in the understanding of youth culture — both spiritually and culturally. As the church wrestles with how to define and achieve success in reaching and discipling young people, we’re re-evaluating and questioning old models and striving for content that can help us adopt effective paradigms.

Our professional development opportunities are easily searchable, helping you further your education in a way that’s meaningful and convenient. Use our advanced search options below to browse our offerings by format, credit type and more. Learn how to earn credits »

Academics are not enough to prepare your child for an independent, engaged, happy future. Our experts also teach the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC), a disability-specific set of skills that focuses on independence, vocational training, social engagement and more, to prepare your student for his or her fullest life possible.

Our continuum of services addresses every need, ability and age – as early as infancy – where and when you need us. We offer day and residential programs on our campus, and direct and consultative services in public schools. We also have parent groups, online learning, activities and ideas for you, your child and his or her teacher.

We know it’s challenging for public schools to adequately address every ECC skill area during the school day. Our experts can fill in the gaps and provide as many or as few services as you need. Teachers and teachers of students with visual impairment (TVIs) can also earn professional development points, college credits and explore best practices through our eLearning program.

Perkins’ interdisciplinary approach builds bridges between subject areas to create themes, rather than teaching subjects in isolation. This thematic instruction integrates basic disciplines like reading and math with the exploration of a broad subject, such as animal communities, Native American cultures, or Lewis and Clark. Such an integrated approach enables students to connect with subject matter in a variety of ways, deepening their learning and broadening their understanding.

Children learn best in small classes, where they are known and appreciated as individuals. Perkins’ small class and school size and close relationships between staff and student fosters learning and social growth. Parents, teachers, and administrators work together to help every child grow to full capacity in all areas of development: cognitive, creative, social, emotional, and physical. To ensure a truly optimal learning experience, we are mindful of all areas of growth in each child.

The bedrock of a quality school experience is the ability to inspire. Children who have experienced a dynamic and motivating curriculum are more likely to be academically prepared, self-confident, and have a life-long love for learning. Our ever-evolving curriculum is based on not only national standards, but also on what will generate student enthusiasm.

Since 1988, the  Perkins School of Youth Ministry  has taken place each January as a way to offer a collaborative learning environment for sharing best practices and trends relating to youths in the church. Bart Patton, with more than 20 years of experience in ministry, is the director of Youth and Young Adult Ministry Education at  Perkins School of Theology . He recently sat down for a question-and-answer session about youth ministry and what the youth ministry participants can expect at this year’s gathering.

This marks the 30th anniversary of Perkins School of Youth Ministry. How has youth ministry changed since 1988 — and what keeps people coming back year after year?

The practice of youth ministry has become fully contextual. Gone are the days of the top-down, hierarchical models for ministry. I think that’s a great thing. We’re coming up with some major shifts in the understanding of youth culture — both spiritually and culturally. As the church wrestles with how to define and achieve success in reaching and discipling young people, we’re re-evaluating and questioning old models and striving for content that can help us adopt effective paradigms.

Since 1988, the  Perkins School of Youth Ministry  has taken place each January as a way to offer a collaborative learning environment for sharing best practices and trends relating to youths in the church. Bart Patton, with more than 20 years of experience in ministry, is the director of Youth and Young Adult Ministry Education at  Perkins School of Theology . He recently sat down for a question-and-answer session about youth ministry and what the youth ministry participants can expect at this year’s gathering.

This marks the 30th anniversary of Perkins School of Youth Ministry. How has youth ministry changed since 1988 — and what keeps people coming back year after year?

The practice of youth ministry has become fully contextual. Gone are the days of the top-down, hierarchical models for ministry. I think that’s a great thing. We’re coming up with some major shifts in the understanding of youth culture — both spiritually and culturally. As the church wrestles with how to define and achieve success in reaching and discipling young people, we’re re-evaluating and questioning old models and striving for content that can help us adopt effective paradigms.

Our professional development opportunities are easily searchable, helping you further your education in a way that’s meaningful and convenient. Use our advanced search options below to browse our offerings by format, credit type and more. Learn how to earn credits »

Academics are not enough to prepare your child for an independent, engaged, happy future. Our experts also teach the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC), a disability-specific set of skills that focuses on independence, vocational training, social engagement and more, to prepare your student for his or her fullest life possible.

Our continuum of services addresses every need, ability and age – as early as infancy – where and when you need us. We offer day and residential programs on our campus, and direct and consultative services in public schools. We also have parent groups, online learning, activities and ideas for you, your child and his or her teacher.

We know it’s challenging for public schools to adequately address every ECC skill area during the school day. Our experts can fill in the gaps and provide as many or as few services as you need. Teachers and teachers of students with visual impairment (TVIs) can also earn professional development points, college credits and explore best practices through our eLearning program.

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