Uploaded by judyjordan on October 8, 2007

The Poor Relief Act 1601 (43 Eliz 1 c 2) was an Act of the Parliament of England . The Act for the Relief of the Poor 1601, popularly known as the Elizabethan Poor Law , "43rd Elizabeth" [3] or the Old Poor Law [4] was passed in 1601 and created a poor law system for England and Wales . [5]

It formalised earlier practices of poor relief distribution in England and Wales [6] and is generally considered a refinement of the Act for the Relief of the Poor 1597 that established Overseers of the Poor . [7] The "Old Poor Law" was not one law but a collection of laws passed between the 16th and 18th centuries. The system's administrative unit was the parish . It was not a centralised government policy [6] but a law which made individual parishes responsible for Poor Law legislation. The 1601 act saw a move away from the more obvious forms of punishing paupers under the Tudor system towards methods of "correction".

The origins of the Old Poor Law extend back into the 15th century with the decline of the monasteries and the breakdown of the medieval social structure. Charity was gradually replaced with a compulsory land tax levied at parish level. [5]

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Author by : Alexander M'Neel-Caird
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 1848
Publisher by :



Description : ...

Note: ebook file has been transmitted via an external affiliate, we can therefore furnish no guarantee for the existence of this file on our servers.

Uploaded by judyjordan on October 8, 2007

The Poor Relief Act 1601 (43 Eliz 1 c 2) was an Act of the Parliament of England . The Act for the Relief of the Poor 1601, popularly known as the Elizabethan Poor Law , "43rd Elizabeth" [3] or the Old Poor Law [4] was passed in 1601 and created a poor law system for England and Wales . [5]

It formalised earlier practices of poor relief distribution in England and Wales [6] and is generally considered a refinement of the Act for the Relief of the Poor 1597 that established Overseers of the Poor . [7] The "Old Poor Law" was not one law but a collection of laws passed between the 16th and 18th centuries. The system's administrative unit was the parish . It was not a centralised government policy [6] but a law which made individual parishes responsible for Poor Law legislation. The 1601 act saw a move away from the more obvious forms of punishing paupers under the Tudor system towards methods of "correction".

The origins of the Old Poor Law extend back into the 15th century with the decline of the monasteries and the breakdown of the medieval social structure. Charity was gradually replaced with a compulsory land tax levied at parish level. [5]

Uploaded by judyjordan on October 8, 2007

The Poor Relief Act 1601 (43 Eliz 1 c 2) was an Act of the Parliament of England . The Act for the Relief of the Poor 1601, popularly known as the Elizabethan Poor Law , "43rd Elizabeth" [3] or the Old Poor Law [4] was passed in 1601 and created a poor law system for England and Wales . [5]

It formalised earlier practices of poor relief distribution in England and Wales [6] and is generally considered a refinement of the Act for the Relief of the Poor 1597 that established Overseers of the Poor . [7] The "Old Poor Law" was not one law but a collection of laws passed between the 16th and 18th centuries. The system's administrative unit was the parish . It was not a centralised government policy [6] but a law which made individual parishes responsible for Poor Law legislation. The 1601 act saw a move away from the more obvious forms of punishing paupers under the Tudor system towards methods of "correction".

The origins of the Old Poor Law extend back into the 15th century with the decline of the monasteries and the breakdown of the medieval social structure. Charity was gradually replaced with a compulsory land tax levied at parish level. [5]

Note:! If the content not Found, you must refresh this page manually or just wait 15 second to this page refresh automatically. As alternative try our Book Search Engine, click here

Author by : Alexander M'Neel-Caird
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 1848
Publisher by :



Description : ...

Note: ebook file has been transmitted via an external affiliate, we can therefore furnish no guarantee for the existence of this file on our servers.

Your editorial (2 April) on the coalition's squeeze on the welfare budget lacks a conclusion. Alongside your criticisms of coalition policy, you ought to be arguing for a positive alternative: which, following the logic of your argument, is clearly for a larger state, with a higher proportion of national income passing through the state, which must continue to rise further as our population ages.

This was, after all, the logic of the position that the Labour government adopted after 2001, when it allowed spending on welfare to rise more rapidly than national income. Labour's failure to raise taxes to match this rise in spending led to successive fiscal deficits from 2002 onwards – even while the economy was booming – thus leaving to the coalition government the overhang of debt that it has been struggling to reduce. 

• In claiming that he will "make work pay" ( Osborne: we will make work pay , 2 April) George Osborne may think he has discovered an important new principle of social policy. In fact he is merely echoing in modern words the Poor Law report of 1834 , which led to the setting up of the workhouses. A central principle of the report was that of "less eligibility", meaning that those supported by the state should be kept in a condition more miserable than that of the lowest-paid labourer. After 180 years it appears that social policy has come full circle.
Geoffrey Renshaw
Department of economics, University of Warwick

Uploaded by judyjordan on October 8, 2007

The Poor Relief Act 1601 (43 Eliz 1 c 2) was an Act of the Parliament of England . The Act for the Relief of the Poor 1601, popularly known as the Elizabethan Poor Law , "43rd Elizabeth" [3] or the Old Poor Law [4] was passed in 1601 and created a poor law system for England and Wales . [5]

It formalised earlier practices of poor relief distribution in England and Wales [6] and is generally considered a refinement of the Act for the Relief of the Poor 1597 that established Overseers of the Poor . [7] The "Old Poor Law" was not one law but a collection of laws passed between the 16th and 18th centuries. The system's administrative unit was the parish . It was not a centralised government policy [6] but a law which made individual parishes responsible for Poor Law legislation. The 1601 act saw a move away from the more obvious forms of punishing paupers under the Tudor system towards methods of "correction".

The origins of the Old Poor Law extend back into the 15th century with the decline of the monasteries and the breakdown of the medieval social structure. Charity was gradually replaced with a compulsory land tax levied at parish level. [5]

Note:! If the content not Found, you must refresh this page manually or just wait 15 second to this page refresh automatically. As alternative try our Book Search Engine, click here

Author by : Alexander M'Neel-Caird
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 1848
Publisher by :



Description : ...

Note: ebook file has been transmitted via an external affiliate, we can therefore furnish no guarantee for the existence of this file on our servers.

Your editorial (2 April) on the coalition's squeeze on the welfare budget lacks a conclusion. Alongside your criticisms of coalition policy, you ought to be arguing for a positive alternative: which, following the logic of your argument, is clearly for a larger state, with a higher proportion of national income passing through the state, which must continue to rise further as our population ages.

This was, after all, the logic of the position that the Labour government adopted after 2001, when it allowed spending on welfare to rise more rapidly than national income. Labour's failure to raise taxes to match this rise in spending led to successive fiscal deficits from 2002 onwards – even while the economy was booming – thus leaving to the coalition government the overhang of debt that it has been struggling to reduce. 

• In claiming that he will "make work pay" ( Osborne: we will make work pay , 2 April) George Osborne may think he has discovered an important new principle of social policy. In fact he is merely echoing in modern words the Poor Law report of 1834 , which led to the setting up of the workhouses. A central principle of the report was that of "less eligibility", meaning that those supported by the state should be kept in a condition more miserable than that of the lowest-paid labourer. After 180 years it appears that social policy has come full circle.
Geoffrey Renshaw
Department of economics, University of Warwick

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Uploaded by judyjordan on October 8, 2007

The poor-law manual for Scotland: Alexander (1814-1880) M.


The poor law manual for Scotland. - Internet Archive

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