A very little boy stood upon a heap of gravel for the honor of Rum Alley. He was throwing stones at howling urchins from Devil's Row who were circling madly about the heap and pelting at him.

Howls of renewed wrath went up from Devil's Row throats. Tattered gamins on the right made a furious assault on the gravel heap. On their small, convulsed faces there shone the grins of true assassins. As they charged, they threw stones and cursed in shrill chorus.

The little champion of Rum Alley stumbled precipitately down the other side. His coat had been torn to shreds in a scuffle, and his hat was gone. He had bruises on twenty parts of his body, and blood was dripping from a cut in his head. His wan features wore a look of a tiny, insane demon.

From here, we move to Chapter 17. This passage shows us what society has forced Maggie to become. I do not believe the book tried to blame this on Maggie. Society and her family (and perhaps her own innocence/ignorance) drove her to this state–to becoming just another prostitute in the city. Even now, like with Pete,  the people she seeks for a living reject her, often looking down on her. Also, one man in this scene calls her Mary, perhaps representing that Maggie, although hating Mary, has become just like her.

I think that this chapter is a very good representative of the naturalistic approach that Crane takes in telling the story. Like you said, “hows us what society has forced Maggie to become,” which is what naturalism essentially does. it I also thought that the book kind of sympathizes with Maggie, as it follows her life surrounded by poverty and points to many factors (Jimmy and her mom) that had a great influence on her life. I also thought that this particular chapter did a good job of portraying the changed Maggie after being corrupted by the poverty in her life. Overall, I thought this was a good post and the chapter was an excellent choice.

I’m not entirely sure what you mean by “Maggie, although hating Mary, has become just like her.” The only thing similar in their characters is that they both end up in terrible situations. If this is what you meant, then I think it is a very good comparison. The difference between Maggie and Mary is that Maggie want to get out of her terrible situation, and Mary is in denial of her terrible situation. This is why Maggie is rejected when she tries to return home. Mary believes that Maggie is not grateful for all the “great” things that were provided when Maggie was a child.

A very little boy stood upon a heap of gravel for the honor of Rum Alley. He was throwing stones at howling urchins from Devil's Row who were circling madly about the heap and pelting at him.

Howls of renewed wrath went up from Devil's Row throats. Tattered gamins on the right made a furious assault on the gravel heap. On their small, convulsed faces there shone the grins of true assassins. As they charged, they threw stones and cursed in shrill chorus.

The little champion of Rum Alley stumbled precipitately down the other side. His coat had been torn to shreds in a scuffle, and his hat was gone. He had bruises on twenty parts of his body, and blood was dripping from a cut in his head. His wan features wore a look of a tiny, insane demon.

A very little boy stood upon a heap of gravel for the honor of Rum Alley. He was throwing stones at howling urchins from Devil's Row who were circling madly about the heap and pelting at him.

Howls of renewed wrath went up from Devil's Row throats. Tattered gamins on the right made a furious assault on the gravel heap. On their small, convulsed faces there shone the grins of true assassins. As they charged, they threw stones and cursed in shrill chorus.

The little champion of Rum Alley stumbled precipitately down the other side. His coat had been torn to shreds in a scuffle, and his hat was gone. He had bruises on twenty parts of his body, and blood was dripping from a cut in his head. His wan features wore a look of a tiny, insane demon.

From here, we move to Chapter 17. This passage shows us what society has forced Maggie to become. I do not believe the book tried to blame this on Maggie. Society and her family (and perhaps her own innocence/ignorance) drove her to this state–to becoming just another prostitute in the city. Even now, like with Pete,  the people she seeks for a living reject her, often looking down on her. Also, one man in this scene calls her Mary, perhaps representing that Maggie, although hating Mary, has become just like her.

I think that this chapter is a very good representative of the naturalistic approach that Crane takes in telling the story. Like you said, “hows us what society has forced Maggie to become,” which is what naturalism essentially does. it I also thought that the book kind of sympathizes with Maggie, as it follows her life surrounded by poverty and points to many factors (Jimmy and her mom) that had a great influence on her life. I also thought that this particular chapter did a good job of portraying the changed Maggie after being corrupted by the poverty in her life. Overall, I thought this was a good post and the chapter was an excellent choice.

I’m not entirely sure what you mean by “Maggie, although hating Mary, has become just like her.” The only thing similar in their characters is that they both end up in terrible situations. If this is what you meant, then I think it is a very good comparison. The difference between Maggie and Mary is that Maggie want to get out of her terrible situation, and Mary is in denial of her terrible situation. This is why Maggie is rejected when she tries to return home. Mary believes that Maggie is not grateful for all the “great” things that were provided when Maggie was a child.

The novel certainly suggests the circumstances of Maggie's death. We see a young prostitute walking through the city; by the riverside, she meets a disgusting man, the embodiment of the filth and violence of the lower city. The sounds and lights of the city fade behind them; "at their feet the river appeared a deathly black hue." It could be inferred that Maggie is murdered by this man, since the next time we hear of her, she is dead. However, because the cause of Maggie's death is never shown, one can just as easily infer that Maggie, disgusted with her life, commits suicide.

SparkNotes: Maggie: A Girl of the Streets: Chapters 14-19.


SparkNotes: Maggie: A Girl of the Streets

Posted by 2018 article

71YK3EWFX9L.gif