Farah - not her real name - met her husband after being introduced to him by a family friend when she was in her 20s. They had children together soon afterwards but then, Farah says, the abuse began.

"He dragged me by my hair through two rooms and tried to throw me out of the house. There would be times where he would just go crazy."

Despite the abuse, Farah hoped things would change. Her husband's behaviour though became increasingly erratic - leading to him "divorcing" her via text message.

During a moment in the checkout line at Costco, it occurred to me that it wouldn’t be the worst time for the apocalypse to strike. There might have been two hundred souls in the building, and if we were suddenly thrust into a survival situation by nuclear attack or zombie outbreak, we would have hundreds of tons of food, along with plenty of pharmaceuticals, first aid supplies, and toilet paper on hand.

If a crisis forced you to spend weeks or months together with a fairly random selection of strangers, you’d soon find out which of these people are a positive, helpful presence, and which aren’t.

Like most people probably do, I like to think I’d be one of the more helpful and welcome members of this new post-apocalyptic family, but I’m not sure why I think that. It’s probably the “ Lake Wobegon Effect ” — our tendency to overestimate our value and capabilities in relation to others. It’s the same phenomenon that has 90% of us believing we’re better-than-average drivers. (Clearly about 40% of us are wrong on that count, but I’m still somehow nearly 100% sure I’m not one of them.)

Reproduced by permission of the Journal of the American Planning Association, v. 66, no. 2, Spring 2000
JAPA section of APA site
JAPA's site

The food system, however, is notable by its absence from the writing of planning scholars, from the plans prepared by planning practitioners, and from the classrooms in which planning students are taught. By the food system, we mean the chain of activities connecting food production, processing, distribution, consumption, and waste management, as well as all the associated regulatory institutions and activities.

We recently taught a rare course for a graduate planning program on planning for a community food system. 2 Our effort, which culminated in a class report titled Fertile Ground: Planning for the Madison/Dane County Food System (University of Wisconsin, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, 1997), convinced us that the food system was extraordinarily important to the health and vitality of communities. It has led us to probe deeper into several questions:

Full of thrilling, imaginative textures, Stranger to Stranger conjures a vivid and vital new context to Simon’s well-established virtuosity as a singer and songwriter.

"The Stranger" is the twentieth episode of Season One of ABC 's Once Upon a Time . It was written by Ian Goldberg & Andrew Chambliss and directed by Gwyneth Horder-Payton . It is the twentieth episode of the series overall, and premiered on April 29, 2012.

August promises to enlighten Emma and take her on a journey that will show her how she can beat Regina , and possibly take custody of Henry ; and with Mary Margaret returning to work , Regina puts a plan in motion to seduce David . Meanwhile, in the fairytale land that was, with the Evil Queen 's curse about to strike, Geppetto agrees to a plan that will save Snow White and Prince Charming 's daughter, but with a proviso that could also save his own son . [1]

August is sitting at his desk admiring a hat that resembles the one Pinocchio wears. He calls Mr. Gold saying they need to meet, as there is a problem with Emma. August then starts having issues with his leg and sits down. He pulls up his pants and reveals a wooden leg.

Farah - not her real name - met her husband after being introduced to him by a family friend when she was in her 20s. They had children together soon afterwards but then, Farah says, the abuse began.

"He dragged me by my hair through two rooms and tried to throw me out of the house. There would be times where he would just go crazy."

Despite the abuse, Farah hoped things would change. Her husband's behaviour though became increasingly erratic - leading to him "divorcing" her via text message.

Farah - not her real name - met her husband after being introduced to him by a family friend when she was in her 20s. They had children together soon afterwards but then, Farah says, the abuse began.

"He dragged me by my hair through two rooms and tried to throw me out of the house. There would be times where he would just go crazy."

Despite the abuse, Farah hoped things would change. Her husband's behaviour though became increasingly erratic - leading to him "divorcing" her via text message.

During a moment in the checkout line at Costco, it occurred to me that it wouldn’t be the worst time for the apocalypse to strike. There might have been two hundred souls in the building, and if we were suddenly thrust into a survival situation by nuclear attack or zombie outbreak, we would have hundreds of tons of food, along with plenty of pharmaceuticals, first aid supplies, and toilet paper on hand.

If a crisis forced you to spend weeks or months together with a fairly random selection of strangers, you’d soon find out which of these people are a positive, helpful presence, and which aren’t.

Like most people probably do, I like to think I’d be one of the more helpful and welcome members of this new post-apocalyptic family, but I’m not sure why I think that. It’s probably the “ Lake Wobegon Effect ” — our tendency to overestimate our value and capabilities in relation to others. It’s the same phenomenon that has 90% of us believing we’re better-than-average drivers. (Clearly about 40% of us are wrong on that count, but I’m still somehow nearly 100% sure I’m not one of them.)

Reproduced by permission of the Journal of the American Planning Association, v. 66, no. 2, Spring 2000
JAPA section of APA site
JAPA's site

The food system, however, is notable by its absence from the writing of planning scholars, from the plans prepared by planning practitioners, and from the classrooms in which planning students are taught. By the food system, we mean the chain of activities connecting food production, processing, distribution, consumption, and waste management, as well as all the associated regulatory institutions and activities.

We recently taught a rare course for a graduate planning program on planning for a community food system. 2 Our effort, which culminated in a class report titled Fertile Ground: Planning for the Madison/Dane County Food System (University of Wisconsin, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, 1997), convinced us that the food system was extraordinarily important to the health and vitality of communities. It has led us to probe deeper into several questions:

Farah - not her real name - met her husband after being introduced to him by a family friend when she was in her 20s. They had children together soon afterwards but then, Farah says, the abuse began.

"He dragged me by my hair through two rooms and tried to throw me out of the house. There would be times where he would just go crazy."

Despite the abuse, Farah hoped things would change. Her husband's behaviour though became increasingly erratic - leading to him "divorcing" her via text message.

During a moment in the checkout line at Costco, it occurred to me that it wouldn’t be the worst time for the apocalypse to strike. There might have been two hundred souls in the building, and if we were suddenly thrust into a survival situation by nuclear attack or zombie outbreak, we would have hundreds of tons of food, along with plenty of pharmaceuticals, first aid supplies, and toilet paper on hand.

If a crisis forced you to spend weeks or months together with a fairly random selection of strangers, you’d soon find out which of these people are a positive, helpful presence, and which aren’t.

Like most people probably do, I like to think I’d be one of the more helpful and welcome members of this new post-apocalyptic family, but I’m not sure why I think that. It’s probably the “ Lake Wobegon Effect ” — our tendency to overestimate our value and capabilities in relation to others. It’s the same phenomenon that has 90% of us believing we’re better-than-average drivers. (Clearly about 40% of us are wrong on that count, but I’m still somehow nearly 100% sure I’m not one of them.)

Reproduced by permission of the Journal of the American Planning Association, v. 66, no. 2, Spring 2000
JAPA section of APA site
JAPA's site

The food system, however, is notable by its absence from the writing of planning scholars, from the plans prepared by planning practitioners, and from the classrooms in which planning students are taught. By the food system, we mean the chain of activities connecting food production, processing, distribution, consumption, and waste management, as well as all the associated regulatory institutions and activities.

We recently taught a rare course for a graduate planning program on planning for a community food system. 2 Our effort, which culminated in a class report titled Fertile Ground: Planning for the Madison/Dane County Food System (University of Wisconsin, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, 1997), convinced us that the food system was extraordinarily important to the health and vitality of communities. It has led us to probe deeper into several questions:

Full of thrilling, imaginative textures, Stranger to Stranger conjures a vivid and vital new context to Simon’s well-established virtuosity as a singer and songwriter.

Farah - not her real name - met her husband after being introduced to him by a family friend when she was in her 20s. They had children together soon afterwards but then, Farah says, the abuse began.

"He dragged me by my hair through two rooms and tried to throw me out of the house. There would be times where he would just go crazy."

Despite the abuse, Farah hoped things would change. Her husband's behaviour though became increasingly erratic - leading to him "divorcing" her via text message.

During a moment in the checkout line at Costco, it occurred to me that it wouldn’t be the worst time for the apocalypse to strike. There might have been two hundred souls in the building, and if we were suddenly thrust into a survival situation by nuclear attack or zombie outbreak, we would have hundreds of tons of food, along with plenty of pharmaceuticals, first aid supplies, and toilet paper on hand.

If a crisis forced you to spend weeks or months together with a fairly random selection of strangers, you’d soon find out which of these people are a positive, helpful presence, and which aren’t.

Like most people probably do, I like to think I’d be one of the more helpful and welcome members of this new post-apocalyptic family, but I’m not sure why I think that. It’s probably the “ Lake Wobegon Effect ” — our tendency to overestimate our value and capabilities in relation to others. It’s the same phenomenon that has 90% of us believing we’re better-than-average drivers. (Clearly about 40% of us are wrong on that count, but I’m still somehow nearly 100% sure I’m not one of them.)

Stranger to Stranger - Wikipedia


Stranger | Define Stranger at Dictionary.com

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