“Buffalo Soldier” is the collective nickname given to the first African-American members of the U.S. Armed Forces. The Buffalo Soldiers, originally the 9 th 10 th , 24 th , and 25 th U.S. Military regiments, were common figures around the U.S./Mexico border during the turn of the century. Henry Flipper, the first African-American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy (1877), and Charles Young, an officer of the 9 th and 10 th Cavalries and the 25 th Infantry, both spent time patrolling the barely tamed outpost of Fort Huachuca.

Fort Huachuca was the onetime home of every regiment of the original Buffalo Soldiers, starting in 1892, with the arrival of companies from the 24 th Infantry. (The 24th and 25th Infantries were consolidated from the 38 th , 39 th , 40 th , and 41 st Infantries.) The 10 th Cavalry arrived at Fort Huachuca in December 1913 and stayed for eighteen years. The 10 th Cavalry is thought to be the regiment which established the name "Buffalo Soldiers." History holds that the Native American tribes they fought (likely Comanche or Cheyenne) compared their fighting to that of the mighty buffalo and likened the texture of their hair to the Buffalo’s mane.

In October, 1914, members of the 9 th  and 10 th  Cavalries entrenched themselves on the border during a battle between rebel Mexicans and Mexican federal troops in Naco, Sonora. The troops maintained order without firing for two and a half months, earning a special letter of commendation from President Wilson.

A Conflict of Conscience is a documentary film project which looks at the little known war between the Philippines and the United States at the turn of the 20 th Century. It also focus on the unique relationship which developed between Filipinos and Buffalo Soldiers (Black Soldiers). Thousands of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Filipinos died, nevertheless, something similar to “Compassionate Empathy” developed between these two peoples of color. Once the war was concluded, over one thousand Buffalo Soldiers chose to stay and raise families in the Philippines.

Buffalo Soldiers summary: Originally part of the U.S. 10 th Cavalry Regiment, the Buffalo Soldiers became a separate group on September 21, 1866. This occasion took place at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Native American tribes nicknamed the African American soldiers of the 10 th Cavalry Regiment “Buffalo Soldiers.” In time all U.S. regiments formed of African American soldiers during that time became known as Buffalo Soldiers, which included the 9 th and 10 th Cavalry, and the 24 th and 25 th Infantry, Regiments. The Buffalo Soldiers were active between 1866 and 1951.

The United States Congress declared the Buffalo Soldiers as peacetime regiments consisting of African Americans only and being part of the regular U.S. Army. Six regiments were authorized to be manned by black soldiers but by 1869, there was a downsizing of all troops and the black regiments were cut down to two Infantry regiments and two cavalry regiments.

Buffalo Soldiers were instrumental in the American Civil War. They were mostly stationed at posts within the Great Plains as well as the Southwestern regions of the nation. These soldiers fought bravely against the Indians and a total of nineteen Medals of Honor were earned by them. Some of the battles of the buffalo Soldiers and their predecessors included the fight at Cabin Creek and at Honey Springs in the summer of 1863/64 and the Red River War in 1875.

    With the release of the movie "Glory", made by Tri- Star Pictures in 1989, we saw the first real interest in the part that Negroes played in our Military history. But this did not start with the Buffalo Soldiers or even the American Civil War. It started much earlier.

Negro Troops marched in the ranks of Washington's armies, in the cause of independence. They served with Andrew Jackson at New Orleans in 1815 to repel the British invaders. But it was their first large scale employment during the American Civil War, that they made their real entrance into American History.

When Confederate batteries fired on Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861. Negroes were eager to wear the Union blue, but it wouldn't come easy.

“Buffalo Soldier” is the collective nickname given to the first African-American members of the U.S. Armed Forces. The Buffalo Soldiers, originally the 9 th 10 th , 24 th , and 25 th U.S. Military regiments, were common figures around the U.S./Mexico border during the turn of the century. Henry Flipper, the first African-American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy (1877), and Charles Young, an officer of the 9 th and 10 th Cavalries and the 25 th Infantry, both spent time patrolling the barely tamed outpost of Fort Huachuca.

Fort Huachuca was the onetime home of every regiment of the original Buffalo Soldiers, starting in 1892, with the arrival of companies from the 24 th Infantry. (The 24th and 25th Infantries were consolidated from the 38 th , 39 th , 40 th , and 41 st Infantries.) The 10 th Cavalry arrived at Fort Huachuca in December 1913 and stayed for eighteen years. The 10 th Cavalry is thought to be the regiment which established the name "Buffalo Soldiers." History holds that the Native American tribes they fought (likely Comanche or Cheyenne) compared their fighting to that of the mighty buffalo and likened the texture of their hair to the Buffalo’s mane.

In October, 1914, members of the 9 th  and 10 th  Cavalries entrenched themselves on the border during a battle between rebel Mexicans and Mexican federal troops in Naco, Sonora. The troops maintained order without firing for two and a half months, earning a special letter of commendation from President Wilson.

A Conflict of Conscience is a documentary film project which looks at the little known war between the Philippines and the United States at the turn of the 20 th Century. It also focus on the unique relationship which developed between Filipinos and Buffalo Soldiers (Black Soldiers). Thousands of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Filipinos died, nevertheless, something similar to “Compassionate Empathy” developed between these two peoples of color. Once the war was concluded, over one thousand Buffalo Soldiers chose to stay and raise families in the Philippines.

“Buffalo Soldier” is the collective nickname given to the first African-American members of the U.S. Armed Forces. The Buffalo Soldiers, originally the 9 th 10 th , 24 th , and 25 th U.S. Military regiments, were common figures around the U.S./Mexico border during the turn of the century. Henry Flipper, the first African-American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy (1877), and Charles Young, an officer of the 9 th and 10 th Cavalries and the 25 th Infantry, both spent time patrolling the barely tamed outpost of Fort Huachuca.

Fort Huachuca was the onetime home of every regiment of the original Buffalo Soldiers, starting in 1892, with the arrival of companies from the 24 th Infantry. (The 24th and 25th Infantries were consolidated from the 38 th , 39 th , 40 th , and 41 st Infantries.) The 10 th Cavalry arrived at Fort Huachuca in December 1913 and stayed for eighteen years. The 10 th Cavalry is thought to be the regiment which established the name "Buffalo Soldiers." History holds that the Native American tribes they fought (likely Comanche or Cheyenne) compared their fighting to that of the mighty buffalo and likened the texture of their hair to the Buffalo’s mane.

In October, 1914, members of the 9 th  and 10 th  Cavalries entrenched themselves on the border during a battle between rebel Mexicans and Mexican federal troops in Naco, Sonora. The troops maintained order without firing for two and a half months, earning a special letter of commendation from President Wilson.

A Conflict of Conscience is a documentary film project which looks at the little known war between the Philippines and the United States at the turn of the 20 th Century. It also focus on the unique relationship which developed between Filipinos and Buffalo Soldiers (Black Soldiers). Thousands of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Filipinos died, nevertheless, something similar to “Compassionate Empathy” developed between these two peoples of color. Once the war was concluded, over one thousand Buffalo Soldiers chose to stay and raise families in the Philippines.

Buffalo Soldiers summary: Originally part of the U.S. 10 th Cavalry Regiment, the Buffalo Soldiers became a separate group on September 21, 1866. This occasion took place at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Native American tribes nicknamed the African American soldiers of the 10 th Cavalry Regiment “Buffalo Soldiers.” In time all U.S. regiments formed of African American soldiers during that time became known as Buffalo Soldiers, which included the 9 th and 10 th Cavalry, and the 24 th and 25 th Infantry, Regiments. The Buffalo Soldiers were active between 1866 and 1951.

The United States Congress declared the Buffalo Soldiers as peacetime regiments consisting of African Americans only and being part of the regular U.S. Army. Six regiments were authorized to be manned by black soldiers but by 1869, there was a downsizing of all troops and the black regiments were cut down to two Infantry regiments and two cavalry regiments.

Buffalo Soldiers were instrumental in the American Civil War. They were mostly stationed at posts within the Great Plains as well as the Southwestern regions of the nation. These soldiers fought bravely against the Indians and a total of nineteen Medals of Honor were earned by them. Some of the battles of the buffalo Soldiers and their predecessors included the fight at Cabin Creek and at Honey Springs in the summer of 1863/64 and the Red River War in 1875.

    With the release of the movie "Glory", made by Tri- Star Pictures in 1989, we saw the first real interest in the part that Negroes played in our Military history. But this did not start with the Buffalo Soldiers or even the American Civil War. It started much earlier.

Negro Troops marched in the ranks of Washington's armies, in the cause of independence. They served with Andrew Jackson at New Orleans in 1815 to repel the British invaders. But it was their first large scale employment during the American Civil War, that they made their real entrance into American History.

When Confederate batteries fired on Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861. Negroes were eager to wear the Union blue, but it wouldn't come easy.

We are a non-profit organization of Americans who share a common interest the sport of motorcycling and the study of African American History. We ride under the name of Buffalo Soldiers to express our pride in, and our respect for the many accomplishments they made during the Civil War. We tell the story of the courageous Buffalo Soldiers and the brave Native American Chiefs and warriors that they fought during the settlement of the American West. We strive to honor this heritage by performing community service that enhances and promotes cultural and ethnic awareness. 

“Buffalo Soldier” is the collective nickname given to the first African-American members of the U.S. Armed Forces. The Buffalo Soldiers, originally the 9 th 10 th , 24 th , and 25 th U.S. Military regiments, were common figures around the U.S./Mexico border during the turn of the century. Henry Flipper, the first African-American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy (1877), and Charles Young, an officer of the 9 th and 10 th Cavalries and the 25 th Infantry, both spent time patrolling the barely tamed outpost of Fort Huachuca.

Fort Huachuca was the onetime home of every regiment of the original Buffalo Soldiers, starting in 1892, with the arrival of companies from the 24 th Infantry. (The 24th and 25th Infantries were consolidated from the 38 th , 39 th , 40 th , and 41 st Infantries.) The 10 th Cavalry arrived at Fort Huachuca in December 1913 and stayed for eighteen years. The 10 th Cavalry is thought to be the regiment which established the name "Buffalo Soldiers." History holds that the Native American tribes they fought (likely Comanche or Cheyenne) compared their fighting to that of the mighty buffalo and likened the texture of their hair to the Buffalo’s mane.

In October, 1914, members of the 9 th  and 10 th  Cavalries entrenched themselves on the border during a battle between rebel Mexicans and Mexican federal troops in Naco, Sonora. The troops maintained order without firing for two and a half months, earning a special letter of commendation from President Wilson.

A Conflict of Conscience is a documentary film project which looks at the little known war between the Philippines and the United States at the turn of the 20 th Century. It also focus on the unique relationship which developed between Filipinos and Buffalo Soldiers (Black Soldiers). Thousands of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Filipinos died, nevertheless, something similar to “Compassionate Empathy” developed between these two peoples of color. Once the war was concluded, over one thousand Buffalo Soldiers chose to stay and raise families in the Philippines.

Buffalo Soldiers summary: Originally part of the U.S. 10 th Cavalry Regiment, the Buffalo Soldiers became a separate group on September 21, 1866. This occasion took place at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Native American tribes nicknamed the African American soldiers of the 10 th Cavalry Regiment “Buffalo Soldiers.” In time all U.S. regiments formed of African American soldiers during that time became known as Buffalo Soldiers, which included the 9 th and 10 th Cavalry, and the 24 th and 25 th Infantry, Regiments. The Buffalo Soldiers were active between 1866 and 1951.

The United States Congress declared the Buffalo Soldiers as peacetime regiments consisting of African Americans only and being part of the regular U.S. Army. Six regiments were authorized to be manned by black soldiers but by 1869, there was a downsizing of all troops and the black regiments were cut down to two Infantry regiments and two cavalry regiments.

Buffalo Soldiers were instrumental in the American Civil War. They were mostly stationed at posts within the Great Plains as well as the Southwestern regions of the nation. These soldiers fought bravely against the Indians and a total of nineteen Medals of Honor were earned by them. Some of the battles of the buffalo Soldiers and their predecessors included the fight at Cabin Creek and at Honey Springs in the summer of 1863/64 and the Red River War in 1875.

“Buffalo Soldier” is the collective nickname given to the first African-American members of the U.S. Armed Forces. The Buffalo Soldiers, originally the 9 th 10 th , 24 th , and 25 th U.S. Military regiments, were common figures around the U.S./Mexico border during the turn of the century. Henry Flipper, the first African-American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy (1877), and Charles Young, an officer of the 9 th and 10 th Cavalries and the 25 th Infantry, both spent time patrolling the barely tamed outpost of Fort Huachuca.

Fort Huachuca was the onetime home of every regiment of the original Buffalo Soldiers, starting in 1892, with the arrival of companies from the 24 th Infantry. (The 24th and 25th Infantries were consolidated from the 38 th , 39 th , 40 th , and 41 st Infantries.) The 10 th Cavalry arrived at Fort Huachuca in December 1913 and stayed for eighteen years. The 10 th Cavalry is thought to be the regiment which established the name "Buffalo Soldiers." History holds that the Native American tribes they fought (likely Comanche or Cheyenne) compared their fighting to that of the mighty buffalo and likened the texture of their hair to the Buffalo’s mane.

In October, 1914, members of the 9 th  and 10 th  Cavalries entrenched themselves on the border during a battle between rebel Mexicans and Mexican federal troops in Naco, Sonora. The troops maintained order without firing for two and a half months, earning a special letter of commendation from President Wilson.

Bob Marley - Buffalo soldier - YouTube


Who were the buffalo soldiers? - Ask History

Posted by 2018 article

61OhwiB43SL