“Familiarity breeds contempt.” This well-known phrase has origins that go back thousands of years. It was used in the 14 th century by Geoffrey Chaucer in his “Canterbury Tales” and even by Aesop in the 6 th century BC in his fable, “The Fox and the Lion.”

There is something about familiarity that changes the way we respond to others. Twentieth-century humorist, Will Rogers, captured this point when he described an expert as “a man 50 miles from home with a briefcase.”

We tend to think differently about people we don’t know well. It can be easier for these people to shape their reputation and position themselves as authorities. On the other hand, it can be easy to feel differently about the people we know. Why? We know more about them. We can think of them just as ordinary people, not “experts.”

WE KNOW LITTLE about the life of Waldo of Lyons, the man who started the Waldensian Movement, other than his social class. He was a wealthy merchant, well integrated into the political community of Lyons, in France—a man of influence, a man of the establishment.

We know nothing of his life after he was cast out of the city, of his last years, or of his death around the year 1217. Everything centers around a few years, perhaps only a few months. Yet, what we do know about Waldo is very significant in understanding the Waldensians and their beliefs and practices.

Approximately in the years 1173–1176 Waldo made some decisions that radically changed his life.  1)  He commissioned the translation of several books of the Bible  from Latin into his local dialect, French-Provencal (French was not yet established as a language).

“Familiarity breeds contempt.” This well-known phrase has origins that go back thousands of years. It was used in the 14 th century by Geoffrey Chaucer in his “Canterbury Tales” and even by Aesop in the 6 th century BC in his fable, “The Fox and the Lion.”

There is something about familiarity that changes the way we respond to others. Twentieth-century humorist, Will Rogers, captured this point when he described an expert as “a man 50 miles from home with a briefcase.”

We tend to think differently about people we don’t know well. It can be easier for these people to shape their reputation and position themselves as authorities. On the other hand, it can be easy to feel differently about the people we know. Why? We know more about them. We can think of them just as ordinary people, not “experts.”

“Familiarity breeds contempt.” This well-known phrase has origins that go back thousands of years. It was used in the 14 th century by Geoffrey Chaucer in his “Canterbury Tales” and even by Aesop in the 6 th century BC in his fable, “The Fox and the Lion.”

There is something about familiarity that changes the way we respond to others. Twentieth-century humorist, Will Rogers, captured this point when he described an expert as “a man 50 miles from home with a briefcase.”

We tend to think differently about people we don’t know well. It can be easier for these people to shape their reputation and position themselves as authorities. On the other hand, it can be easy to feel differently about the people we know. Why? We know more about them. We can think of them just as ordinary people, not “experts.”

WE KNOW LITTLE about the life of Waldo of Lyons, the man who started the Waldensian Movement, other than his social class. He was a wealthy merchant, well integrated into the political community of Lyons, in France—a man of influence, a man of the establishment.

We know nothing of his life after he was cast out of the city, of his last years, or of his death around the year 1217. Everything centers around a few years, perhaps only a few months. Yet, what we do know about Waldo is very significant in understanding the Waldensians and their beliefs and practices.

Approximately in the years 1173–1176 Waldo made some decisions that radically changed his life.  1)  He commissioned the translation of several books of the Bible  from Latin into his local dialect, French-Provencal (French was not yet established as a language).

Some of the most difficult people to talk to about a relationship with Jesus are the people who are closest to you. It is tough to share your faith with family and longtime friends. Why? Because often, “a prophet is without honor in his own country”. We are going to talk about what that means this morning.

We read the account in Matthew earlier but I want to focus on the account as it is shared in the gospel of Luke. We find it in Luke 4:16-30. I turn to the Luke account because it is the fuller of the two accounts.

There is some question as to when in the ministry of Jesus this visit took place. Matthew places it later and Luke places it earlier in his gospel. It seems to me that the Matthew 13 account may be more accurate chronologically.

“Familiarity breeds contempt.” This well-known phrase has origins that go back thousands of years. It was used in the 14 th century by Geoffrey Chaucer in his “Canterbury Tales” and even by Aesop in the 6 th century BC in his fable, “The Fox and the Lion.”

There is something about familiarity that changes the way we respond to others. Twentieth-century humorist, Will Rogers, captured this point when he described an expert as “a man 50 miles from home with a briefcase.”

We tend to think differently about people we don’t know well. It can be easier for these people to shape their reputation and position themselves as authorities. On the other hand, it can be easy to feel differently about the people we know. Why? We know more about them. We can think of them just as ordinary people, not “experts.”

WE KNOW LITTLE about the life of Waldo of Lyons, the man who started the Waldensian Movement, other than his social class. He was a wealthy merchant, well integrated into the political community of Lyons, in France—a man of influence, a man of the establishment.

We know nothing of his life after he was cast out of the city, of his last years, or of his death around the year 1217. Everything centers around a few years, perhaps only a few months. Yet, what we do know about Waldo is very significant in understanding the Waldensians and their beliefs and practices.

Approximately in the years 1173–1176 Waldo made some decisions that radically changed his life.  1)  He commissioned the translation of several books of the Bible  from Latin into his local dialect, French-Provencal (French was not yet established as a language).

Some of the most difficult people to talk to about a relationship with Jesus are the people who are closest to you. It is tough to share your faith with family and longtime friends. Why? Because often, “a prophet is without honor in his own country”. We are going to talk about what that means this morning.

We read the account in Matthew earlier but I want to focus on the account as it is shared in the gospel of Luke. We find it in Luke 4:16-30. I turn to the Luke account because it is the fuller of the two accounts.

There is some question as to when in the ministry of Jesus this visit took place. Matthew places it later and Luke places it earlier in his gospel. It seems to me that the Matthew 13 account may be more accurate chronologically.

From the mountain lakesides of the Bavarian Alps, through the battlefields of World War I, the bistros of 1919 Paris, the beer halls of Munich, and the decadence of 1920's Berlin, 'A Prophet Without Honor' recounts the life story of Karl von Haydenreich, from birth to a collision with destiny in the grim offices of the Chancellery of the Third Reich. It is a rich, compelling story of sweeping scope and drama, full of romance and intrigue, and the eternal conflict of love and honor.

Joseph Wurtenbaugh is the writing name of Frank Dudley Berry, Jr. 'Mr. Wurtenbaugh' has published two novels on Amazon (including this one) and three novellas. One of his novellas, 'The Old Soul'. was an Editor's Choice selection in 2012 and one of the top ten sellers of the year. Another, 'Warm Moonlight' also sold over 10,000 copies and was selected by Kindle for inclusion in its initial catalog when Kindle Select became availabe in German in 2013. (translated as 'Warmtes Mondlicht'),

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Mark 6:4 Jesus said to them, A prophet is not without.

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