Then through browsing the racks at the store, I added the following, based on something I saw in the title or a page-turn, or in the case of Animal Man , a good review:

I reviewed Action Comics #1 here .  Just not the Superman I was interested in reading about, I guess.  (All other DC Comics titles I have reviewed here include links in comic title names in this article).

Green Lantern #1 was spent exclusively on Sinestro, not Hal Jordan, and because I wasn’t interested in an ongoing Sinestro book, I gave up on buying Issue #2, which he also appears to be featured in.

Then through browsing the racks at the store, I added the following, based on something I saw in the title or a page-turn, or in the case of Animal Man , a good review:

I reviewed Action Comics #1 here .  Just not the Superman I was interested in reading about, I guess.  (All other DC Comics titles I have reviewed here include links in comic title names in this article).

Green Lantern #1 was spent exclusively on Sinestro, not Hal Jordan, and because I wasn’t interested in an ongoing Sinestro book, I gave up on buying Issue #2, which he also appears to be featured in.

A short prologue outlines the young men of America joining the army and the threat of the fifth columnists, the nazi spies hidden deep within the American forces. Two fifth columnists in American uniform blow up a local munitions factory that is supplying the local army camp.

Meanwhile, in Washington, D.C., two army generals visit president Franklin Delano Roosevelt and inform him of the threat. They note how every command he makes is sent back to Germany and nothing can be kept secret, even amongst his closest aides. The president asks them what they intend to do. He recommends sending a comic hero like the human torch into the army, and brings in a man named mister Grover, the head of the federal bureau of investigation, who has a plan.

Suddenly, one of the army officials, secretly working for the Gestapo, pulls out a gun and shoots the doctor, professor reinstein. A second shot then obliterates the serum that gave Captain America his powers, meaning no more super soldiers can be created. He lets out a third shot, hitting Grover, before cap bursts through the glass and beats him into submission. The barely conscious spy stumbles into a large electrical device, shocking him to death.

Then through browsing the racks at the store, I added the following, based on something I saw in the title or a page-turn, or in the case of Animal Man , a good review:

I reviewed Action Comics #1 here .  Just not the Superman I was interested in reading about, I guess.  (All other DC Comics titles I have reviewed here include links in comic title names in this article).

Green Lantern #1 was spent exclusively on Sinestro, not Hal Jordan, and because I wasn’t interested in an ongoing Sinestro book, I gave up on buying Issue #2, which he also appears to be featured in.

A short prologue outlines the young men of America joining the army and the threat of the fifth columnists, the nazi spies hidden deep within the American forces. Two fifth columnists in American uniform blow up a local munitions factory that is supplying the local army camp.

Meanwhile, in Washington, D.C., two army generals visit president Franklin Delano Roosevelt and inform him of the threat. They note how every command he makes is sent back to Germany and nothing can be kept secret, even amongst his closest aides. The president asks them what they intend to do. He recommends sending a comic hero like the human torch into the army, and brings in a man named mister Grover, the head of the federal bureau of investigation, who has a plan.

Suddenly, one of the army officials, secretly working for the Gestapo, pulls out a gun and shoots the doctor, professor reinstein. A second shot then obliterates the serum that gave Captain America his powers, meaning no more super soldiers can be created. He lets out a third shot, hitting Grover, before cap bursts through the glass and beats him into submission. The barely conscious spy stumbles into a large electrical device, shocking him to death.

For generations, humanity has been fascinated by the power and destructive force of atomic weapons. Tapping into this, multiple comic book publishers have featured heroes who have taken the name Captain Atom. You may know about Nathaniel Adam, the DC Comics hero who wields incredible quantum power. But what about the versions that preceded him? Let’s take a look at the history of the heroes called Captain Atom, and a few related characters, from 1948 up to 1987. 

American comics had been successful imports to Australia, but then World War II happened and caused a rise in the price of paper and other materials. To save money and help the local economy, the Australian government stated enforcing the Import Licensing Regulation in July 1940, banning foreign materials in the form of paper publications or syndicated proofs. No more comics from the USA! This lead to Australian writers and artists filling in the void. In 1948,  Arthur Mather created the first hero to be called Captain Atom, released by Atlas Publications (not to be confused with the American company Atlas Comics, which evolved into Marvel Comics).

But goofy or not, the stories of Australia’s atom man sold 180,000 copies regularly. The Captain Atom Fan Club boasted having up to 75,000 members. Not bad at all. So what happened to him? Well, we need to talk about what happened to the Australian comic book industry first. A few political groups and politicians targeted the medium as a bad influence on the youth. Then, the ban on imported goods was lifted, meaning American comics came back to Australia.

Captain Atom 1 - Point of Origin (Issue)


Captain Atom -- Vol. 1, Issue 1 (1987, DC) - YouTube

Posted by 2018 article

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