Thus, there was no real dissonance in the minds of early 20th century conservationists like Roosevelt with the idea of “conserving” species by killing, skinning and stuffing (or eating) them. For Roosevelt, conservation came out of the barrel of a Winchester as easily as it did the tip of a pen setting aside land for a national park. Today, in the era of endangered species–threatened as often by environmental factors like climate change as by hunting–many environmentalists would see this as hypocritical. Concluding that it wasn’t, at least in Roosevelt’s mind by the standards of 1910, is not the same as saying it would be OK to do the same thing today.

But in the beer world, the thing that Teddy Roosevelt’s safari is most know for it this. “President Theodore Roosevelt took more than 500 gallons of beer with him on an African safari. Must have been thirsty work!” You see this all over the place, including in today’s ad, which features the tagline “Said T.R. ‘I Want It in Africa.'” And then the artwork, illustrated by Ralph Frederick, shows Roosevelt in Africa followed by men carrying cases of Schlitz beer. Unfortunately, it’s not true. Here’s one account:

Our 26th president loved his beer to the point of brining 500 gallons back from a safari in Africa. That isn’t actually true – it’s a myth. Reality is that Theodore Roosevelt did not drink beer, or much at all, except an occasional Mint Julep. However Teddy Roosevelt knew that beer was powerful, and while training the Rough Riders in Texas, he bought the men all the beer they could drink as a morale booster.

I’ve also read that it was Bass Ale that he took on the safari, but regardless of which beer, it doesn’t really matter which brand since it never happened in the first place. None of the historical accounts of the safari mention the beer which, given the large and heavy amount of beer, you’d expect to be part of the record of the trip. It’s not, as far as I can tell. But it’s a powerful, and persistent, story, and a good story beats the truth almost any day of the week.

At the time of upload, the image license was automatically confirmed using the Flickr API . For more information see Flickr API detail .

Please add additional copyright tags to this image if more specific information about copyright status can be determined. See Commons:Licensing for more information. No known copyright restrictions No restrictions https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/ false

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Thus, there was no real dissonance in the minds of early 20th century conservationists like Roosevelt with the idea of “conserving” species by killing, skinning and stuffing (or eating) them. For Roosevelt, conservation came out of the barrel of a Winchester as easily as it did the tip of a pen setting aside land for a national park. Today, in the era of endangered species–threatened as often by environmental factors like climate change as by hunting–many environmentalists would see this as hypocritical. Concluding that it wasn’t, at least in Roosevelt’s mind by the standards of 1910, is not the same as saying it would be OK to do the same thing today.

But in the beer world, the thing that Teddy Roosevelt’s safari is most know for it this. “President Theodore Roosevelt took more than 500 gallons of beer with him on an African safari. Must have been thirsty work!” You see this all over the place, including in today’s ad, which features the tagline “Said T.R. ‘I Want It in Africa.'” And then the artwork, illustrated by Ralph Frederick, shows Roosevelt in Africa followed by men carrying cases of Schlitz beer. Unfortunately, it’s not true. Here’s one account:

Our 26th president loved his beer to the point of brining 500 gallons back from a safari in Africa. That isn’t actually true – it’s a myth. Reality is that Theodore Roosevelt did not drink beer, or much at all, except an occasional Mint Julep. However Teddy Roosevelt knew that beer was powerful, and while training the Rough Riders in Texas, he bought the men all the beer they could drink as a morale booster.

I’ve also read that it was Bass Ale that he took on the safari, but regardless of which beer, it doesn’t really matter which brand since it never happened in the first place. None of the historical accounts of the safari mention the beer which, given the large and heavy amount of beer, you’d expect to be part of the record of the trip. It’s not, as far as I can tell. But it’s a powerful, and persistent, story, and a good story beats the truth almost any day of the week.

At the time of upload, the image license was automatically confirmed using the Flickr API . For more information see Flickr API detail .

Please add additional copyright tags to this image if more specific information about copyright status can be determined. See Commons:Licensing for more information. No known copyright restrictions No restrictions https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/ false

Thus, there was no real dissonance in the minds of early 20th century conservationists like Roosevelt with the idea of “conserving” species by killing, skinning and stuffing (or eating) them. For Roosevelt, conservation came out of the barrel of a Winchester as easily as it did the tip of a pen setting aside land for a national park. Today, in the era of endangered species–threatened as often by environmental factors like climate change as by hunting–many environmentalists would see this as hypocritical. Concluding that it wasn’t, at least in Roosevelt’s mind by the standards of 1910, is not the same as saying it would be OK to do the same thing today.

Thus, there was no real dissonance in the minds of early 20th century conservationists like Roosevelt with the idea of “conserving” species by killing, skinning and stuffing (or eating) them. For Roosevelt, conservation came out of the barrel of a Winchester as easily as it did the tip of a pen setting aside land for a national park. Today, in the era of endangered species–threatened as often by environmental factors like climate change as by hunting–many environmentalists would see this as hypocritical. Concluding that it wasn’t, at least in Roosevelt’s mind by the standards of 1910, is not the same as saying it would be OK to do the same thing today.

But in the beer world, the thing that Teddy Roosevelt’s safari is most know for it this. “President Theodore Roosevelt took more than 500 gallons of beer with him on an African safari. Must have been thirsty work!” You see this all over the place, including in today’s ad, which features the tagline “Said T.R. ‘I Want It in Africa.'” And then the artwork, illustrated by Ralph Frederick, shows Roosevelt in Africa followed by men carrying cases of Schlitz beer. Unfortunately, it’s not true. Here’s one account:

Our 26th president loved his beer to the point of brining 500 gallons back from a safari in Africa. That isn’t actually true – it’s a myth. Reality is that Theodore Roosevelt did not drink beer, or much at all, except an occasional Mint Julep. However Teddy Roosevelt knew that beer was powerful, and while training the Rough Riders in Texas, he bought the men all the beer they could drink as a morale booster.

I’ve also read that it was Bass Ale that he took on the safari, but regardless of which beer, it doesn’t really matter which brand since it never happened in the first place. None of the historical accounts of the safari mention the beer which, given the large and heavy amount of beer, you’d expect to be part of the record of the trip. It’s not, as far as I can tell. But it’s a powerful, and persistent, story, and a good story beats the truth almost any day of the week.

Smithsonian–Roosevelt African Expedition - Wikipedia


Roosevelt s African Trip, First Edition - AbeBooks

Posted by 2018 article

51ys0jNaARL